How a Fear of What People Think of Us Can Hold Us Back As Writers

When we want to write, a fear of what other people think about us can really hold us back from:

  • Writing the way we want to write
  • Showing our writing to others (and therefore missing out on potentially valuable feedback, or even publication).
  • Writing at all!

I suppose, as human beings, we usually want to be accepted and approved of, even if it’s only because it’s much easier than feeling out of kilter and unaccepted.

So sometimes we hide who we really are in an attempt to fit in better.

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You can watch a video of this blog post, or carry on reading!

For many years, while I was building my career as a writer, there were times when I wished with all my heart that I wasn’t a creative person. Yes, really!

I was working thirty-seven hours a week in a college of further education at the time – I’d started there as a temporary typist, then worked my way up to the heady heights of Central Admissions Officer, dealing with hundreds of applications to the college within an office of Examinations Officers.

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I expect you get the picture. I was bored out of my mind. Frustrated that I had to work in a job I disliked so much, when all I wanted to do was to write my novels.

I was a fish-out-of-water, and I didn’t want be a fish-out-of-water.

 

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I longed to belong, the way everyone else seemed to belong. I didn’t want to be viewed as a single, ex-art-college oddity, even if that was exactly what I was.

I wanted to be:

  • A relaxed receptionist.

  • An elated examinations officer.

  • A contented catering assistant.

I was convinced that people who didn’t experience a compelling need to produce art or literature found life amuch simpler. That they didn’t feel constantly torn and dissatisfied the way I did, and that it was much easier for them to feel contended.

I thought they could just be in a way I often couldn’t. (Even at my father’s funeral, there was a part of me – the writer part – that stood at a distance from events, observing everything and everyone. I loathed it, but was powerless to stop it.)

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Back then, I thought everyone but me was content to live in the moment, without constantly wanting to submerge themselves in make-believe or to use their experiences to produce something. That they just were.

I also believed they were critical of me because I wasn't like them.

It was complete rubbish, of course.

I imagine the rest of the college staff mostly fitted in better than I did because they made more effort that I did. That at work, their creativity, or their focus, went into doing a good job, and not into getting by grudgingly until five o’clock.

And far from being judgemental or critical about little old self-conscious me and my way of life, I don't suppose they gave me very much thought at all!

I didn’t really stop worrying about what people thought of me until I was older, and had learnt to accept myself.

And getting consistently published was a large part of that, because with several books under my belt, at least I could think to myself, OK, I may be different, but at least I’m getting paid for it. People are buying my books. Enjoying them too, hopefully.

But the point is, if I’d allowed my fear of what other people thought of me - or in my case perhaps what I thought people thought of me - to completely destroy my spirit, then I might never have written my books. Or, even if I had written them, I may never have found the courage to show them to anybody. Or to take the initiative to ask for opportunities, or to pitch ideas, or any of the other things that can lead to success as an author.

When we first set out on our writing journey, the company and encouragement of other writers and would-be writers who understand can be a vital boost to our self-confidence.

As we start to trust other writers, we feel able to take that first frightening step of letting them read our work. And as with anything that’s frightening or challenging, every time you share your writing with other people, it gets easier to do. Your comfort zone expands, almost without you being aware of it doing so.

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So, if you're holding back from writing or showing your writing out of a fear of what other people will think of you, try to take some action to break through that barrier, a little at a time.

Small steps.

  • Write exactly as you want to write.

  • Do something that could lead to you finding someone to share your writing with, like joining a writing group, class or forum.

  • And gradually, gradually, start to belive in yourself and your dreams.

As you do so, your horizons will expand almost without you realising it.

Good luck!

Join my FREE 10-Day Fear-Busting Challenge For Authors and conquer your fears about writing!
Join my FREE 10-Day Fear-Busting Challenge For Authors and conquer your fears about writing!

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