Tag Archives: humour

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As a multi-published author, there are some questions that I get asked over and over again. One of these is:

"Where do you get your ideas from?"

When a would-be writer asks me this question, I'm often pretty certain that what they really want to know is, "Where can I get my ideas from?" Or, "How do I go about getting ideas for my writing?" So, I thought I'd make some videos about the way some of my ideas for my books have come to me, in case it helps other writers.

The first thing to say, is that there's no "one size fits all" way for me to get ideas for my novels and stories - ideas come to me from many different sources and in many different forms. It's bound to be the same for you.

On today's video, I'm talking about the way work and the various work places I've experienced have given me ideas for characters themes, and even whole novels. (Spoiler alert: it includes the world's largest trifle!)

trifle

 

A post that first appeared on author Jane Bye's The Breath of Africa blog.

When I travelled to Cuba in 2001, it was with revenge in mind. Don’t worry, I didn’t smuggle any weaponry into the country in my luggage. I simply chose Cuba as a destination because I’d been learning Spanish with my ex-partner, and I knew that Cuba would be a country he’d love to visit. But he wasn’t here. I was. And after I’d got beyond the unbelievable chaos of the arrivals lounge, it was to be a fortnight of amazing experiences and fun.

It was around six months since my relationship had suddenly ended, and I was still feeling very raw. Fortunately, I palled up quickly with Sharon, a fun-loving Londoner I’m still friendly with today. Together we wondered at the near-empty supermarket shelves, gazed in awe at the crumbling buildings and were chauffeured in classic cars.

Cuban taxis, courtesy of Sarah Morgan
Cuban taxis, courtesy of Sarah Morgan

We visited cigar factories, learned about black magic and the Revolution, and spent a crazy hour making – and wearing – fake Castro beards out of catkin seeds stuck onto double-sided sellotape. We played and we laughed, and we fell in love with Cuba with the ever-present images of Che Guevara looking down on our shenanigans. It was absolutely the best gift I could have given my broken heart.

 

Messing about with fake Castro beards
Messing about with fake Castro beards

Murder Maker - A Story of Revenge

When I returned to the UK, I was to use Cuba as a setting for scenes in two books. First came Murder Maker, a novella for the TEFL market aimed at people learning to speak English. It’s about woman who becomes a serial killer as a result of being cruelly dumped by her partner. Yes, I admit it, it was my therapy book.

 

 

 

Later, I wrote Taming Tom Jones, which was published by Crooked Cat Publishing last year. In Taming Tom Jones, I wanted to move two of my female characters out of their usual environment to throw a spotlight on the nature of their friendship.

 

TTJ Cover

Havana proved to be perfect for this. The rambling, decaying streets of Havana play on your imagination and feel full of mystery and the potential for adventure. Even danger. Just right for the dynamics of a friendship to be exposed. Jen, one of my main characters in Taming Tom Jones, is a bit adrift as a person; carried on the tide of other peoples’ wishes and desires. Her time in Cuba acts as one stepping stone to her taking back control of her life, Just as, I suppose, my time in Cuba did for me.

 

I went on to get over my heartbreak and to build a much more fulfilled and successful life for myself, but I have never forgotten how it felt to be that broken person who flew into Havana hoping for the forgetfulness of adventures. Cuba and the power of writing brought me through it, and it is for this reason that I have just published my first non-fiction book, The Four Seasons of Breakupvia – A Workbook for Recovery from Relationship Break-up at the end of April

3D image of Breakupvia

 

It is a book of activities and writing exercises designed to take people through the grieving and re-building process following a relationship break-up, and it draws not only on my own experience of recovery, but also on research I have done on the subject, and my experience as a creative writing tutor. I’m extremely proud of it, and really hope it does people good, and that through using it, I can help them to discover the incredible power of the written word in dealing with loss. I secretly hope to turn them all into writers too!

A close friend of mine recently spent four days in Havana and was just as enthralled with it as I was all those years ago. From what she says, it’s hardly changed at all, right down to the near-empty supermarket shelves. Which obviously I realise, can hardly be a good experience for its people. They are extremely resourceful people though; you’d have to be to be able to keep all those amazing classic cars on the road year after year.

Faded colour, Cuba, courtesy of Sarah Morgan
Faded colour, Cuba, courtesy of Sarah Morgan

So, I want to finish off by thanking them and their country for what they gave me for those two weeks I visited. I arrived feeling completely vulnerable and depleted, and left with a thousand experiences and memories to bring my characters and stories to vibrant life.

It was a magical time, and I shall never forget it.

 

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In life there are many different ways to define success, and writing is no different.

Some of you will want to write a best-selling novel and to see your book prominently displayed in bookshops. Screen play rights snapped up.  Invitations to appear as a guest on TV shows.

Others of you will just get a warm glow from having been able to express what you want to say, or from being able to push through to the point where you can type THE END despite the busyness of your lives or an ongoing battle with self-confidence or dyslexia.

There is no definition of writerly success. It's an entirely personal thing. It's whatever's right for you.

If you wanted to take up badminton, it would be perfectly valid to go along to classes with the goals of learning to perfect your serve, forehand and backhand, and to have fun while you were  doing it. Nobody would immediately expect you to be working towards representing your country at the next Olympic Games.

 

badminton-1019110_640

 

It's the same with writing.

The chances are, your view of what success is will change anyway. Once you've got the writing bug, you're unlikely to want to stop at one story, one blog post or one novel. To complete any of these to a standard you're pleased with is an amazing achievement that deserves to be celebrated, and it's perfectly legitimate to be content with just that.

 

clebrating writerly success with champagne

 

But if you're anything like me, the very act of completing a piece of writing will boost your confidence and you'll probably find yourself asking "What next?"

The definitions of writerly success are as varied as people are varied.

In no particular order, here are some I've gleaned from the comments made to a blog post by Brian Clems on the Writer's Digest blog. Writer's Digest - What Defines Writing Success? They make for interesting reading.

I feel/will feel successful as a writer when:

  • Someone is moved by what I write.
  • I fell in love with the process of writing.
  • I'm writing for a living.
  • I find time to write every day.
  • I've written the novel that's been in the back of my mind for years.
  • I finished a first draft.
  • I made someone laugh. Intentionally.
  • I got paid for my writing.
  • People tell other people about my writing.
  • I can quite my day job and just write.
  • My wife can quit her day job, having support me in my writing for ten years.
  • I got placed in a writing competition.
  • When I could say "I'm a writer" without feeling like a fraud.
  • I found the courage to show somebody something I've written.
  • I start to edit when I've been given feedback on my writing.
  • I sit down and actually write.
  • I got my first novel published.
  • I first saw my name in print.
  • I manage to write for half an hour without going on the Internet.
  • I have visitors but still manage to sneak away to write.
  • I write blog posts that touch a chord with people.
  • I reach the word count I've set myself for the day.
  • People still read my books after I'm dead. (!)
  • The first time I paid my rent with my writing income.
  • I reached page 100 in the novel I was writing.

writing-828911_1920

 

Personally, I'll never forget the day I received a letter telling me that my first novella was going to be published. It was called Stormy September, and it was a 50,000 word romance which was to be published by Woman's Weekly in a paperback with another author's story. When publication day came, and the book was in a carousel at my local newsagents, I was so thrilled. I kept having to go in there to look at it. I probably even bought a copy; I can't remember. And celebrate? You bet I did! I used some of the money I was paid to take my boyfriend - who had never flown before - for a surprise flight over Brighton. (I'll draw a veil over the fact that I was horribly sick when the pilot let him take the controls). I also bought a gas fire and a new radio. I know how to live. 🙂

 

aircraft-1113851_640

 

Actually, I say I'll never forget that heady excitement; but I perhaps I have, just a little. Because for me, writing is a bit like having a gambling habit. One win, or one bit of success or encouragement, feeds your habit and makes you want more.

horses-630229_640

 

And then it's easy to become discontented with what you have achieved, especially if you make the mistake of comparing yourself to somebody else; somebody whose debut novel shoots straight to the top of the Amazon charts.

Last year, one of my language readers, Kilimnajaro won an award.

Adolescent & Adult: Intermediate

Kilimanjaro
Author: Margaret Johnson
Illustrator: Redbean Design Pte Ltd
Publisher: National Geographic/CENGAGE Learning
ISBN: 9781424048753

I also had 2 novels published.

ANiW Final Cover
A Nightingale in Winter Published by Omnific Publishing
Taming Tom Jones Published by Crooked Cat Publishing
Taming Tom Jones
Published by Crooked Cat Publishing

 

Most people would say that's pretty successful. Now, if I can just stop listening to those pesky voices that say such things as "Yeah, but you didn't get any money for the award," and "But your book isn't charting as highly as (INSERT NAME HERE)'s book is." 

Perhaps I need to take my own advice and make time to enjoy the process of writing. Yes, I'm going to do just that!

What's your definition of writerly success? I'd love to know!

Cheers.

Margaret

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FeelTheFearAndWriteAnyway

Write about what you know...

Authors are often advised to write about what they know. Sound advice, because then it will come across as vividly in our writing. But if we followed that advice to the letter, then what we could write about would be very limited. Sometimes you have to go out and deliberately create experience to write about - like the time I decided to make one of my characters challenge herself to perform stand-up comedy.

As a child and a teen, I really lacked self-confidence. But it wasn't until my thirties that I made a deliberate decision to do something about it. I set myself small, achievable goals, like challenging myself to say one thing during an adult education lesson, taking baby steps until gradually, over several years, my self-confidence and self-esteem increased. Now I teach creative writing and give talks to groups of business women - both things I could never have contemplated doing in the past.

Ongoing challenges

The habit of challenging myself hasn't gone away though, and I like to keep my 'taking risks and doing scary things' muscles honed. That's why, a few years back, I decided to include the challenge of performing stand-up comedy in my novel The Dare Club. I knew I'd have to do it, you see, in order for it to feel authentic. Here's what I wrote about the experience at the time. And by the way, I'm still proud of this achievement! Although it has proved a difficult one to top.... Suggestions, anyone? 😉

Performing Stand-up Comedy in Greenwich

I did it! Last Tuesday night I went to London and performed my 3-minute stand-up comedy routine at Up the Creek in Greenwich in front of an audience of around 200 people! I’ve been waiting to tell you about it until I had the footage, and now I can reveal all!

Those of you who have been reading my blog regularly know that I set myself this challenge as part of the research for The Dare Club – the novel I’m writing about a group of newly divorced and separated people who set themselves challenges as part of their recovery process. My character Colette is going to have a go at stand-up comedy, so I had to do it. I don’t feel the need to try out all my characters’ dares – after all I have got an imagination. But I really felt I needed to experience the terror of this particular one.

The day started at The London Theatre with a 1-1 with Harry Denford, the comedian who delivers the course. Feeling nervous, I ran through my material, and Harry suggested I cut some things and change others. I wasn’t entirely sure I agreed with everything he said, but hey, I’m the rookie – he’s been doing this for 20 years or more, so I took his advice. Then we ran through it again, focussing on how to perform it so that the audience was involved rather than just being recited to. The session finished with him telling me that the other comedians were meeting in a noodle bar near Up the Creek at 5.45pm. “Look for a group of people who don’t look as if they should be together,” he advised me. “All sorts of people do this course.”

I went to Greenwich to look at the outside of the venue. It seemed surreal that later on I would be performing inside! But I didn’t feel tempted to flee to the nearest station to get the hell out of there. It had been far too difficult arranging childcare etc for that! Besides, I wanted to see what I was capable of.

Outside Up The Creek Comedy Club, Greenwich
Outside Up The Creek Comedy Club, Greenwich

I killed the rest of the afternoon by alternately taking in the sights of Greenwich and practising my act in toilet cubicles. Close to the Cutty Sark, I spotted a man walking round talking to himself. “I bet he’s one of the comedians,” I thought, and sure enough, when I approached a group of people in the noodle bar at 5.45, there he was.

I made myself eat something and exchanged nervous chatter. Then all too soon it was time to go. I loved the inside of the comedy club, but all those empty seats were daunting. The other comedians had invited between 20-40 guests each! Mad! I’d invited 1, my mate Sharon, who'd promised to film me doing my act.

Harry told us all to have a go on stage, to practise going on and off and looking at the ‘audience’. The lights were so bright, you couldn’t see anything! 

The Comedy Stage Awaits
The Comedy Stage Awaits

After a long wait and lots more angst and practise, Harry announced the running order. I was to go 4th, after a guy who looked like a younger Colin Firth. I was happy with 4th – not 1st, but not having to wait too long. Good.

The place was packed out – not a spare seat! Sharon was at the front with her video camera. It was real – it was actually going to happen!

The chairs for the performers were arranged around the back of the club. It was a bit like one of those hairdressers where you don’t need an appointment and you keep moving round until it’s you turn. But when I got to the last seat, I couldn’t sit down. I was too pumped up with adrenalin. Just before the MC announced my name, I did a few jumps and arms wings, limbering up. I expect I looked like a prat, but that was the least of my concerns at that moment.

Then it was time. And amazingly, a feeling of calm settled over me as I went up the steps to the stage. We’d been told to take the mic out of the stand and to put the stand behind us. I did so – it took an age. But then I looked out at the invisible audience, said ‘hello’ and dived in.

Ok, it wasn’t perfect.

I didn’t have the mic quite in the right place to begin with so I started off a bit quiet.

I forgot to include one of my jokes, which meant the one that preceded it didn’t work quite so well.

Because I’d made some cuts, my routine was slightly short.

But I loved it! People laughed and it felt amazing. I didn’t want it to end. And when total strangers congratulated me at the bar later, I just felt so proud of myself. All the next day, I couldn’t stop smiling. I felt transformed. Who’d have thought that I, who’d once been so painfully shy I couldn’t speak up in front of people at all, could actually go up on stage and entertain a large crowd of people?

I whole-heartedly recommend the experience to everyone.

If you’d like to see my performance, you can view it on YouTube by clicking here. But be warned, it contains swearing, lies and smut, so give it a miss if these are likely to offend you!

Would I do it again? You bet your life I would! In fact, I need to seek out opportunities to make it happen.

And Colette? How is she going to get on? Well, she’s going to have a mixed experience. She’s got a particular reason for wanting to do this challenge, and because of that, she’s going to choose to ignore some of her tutor’s advice. So it could all go horribly wrong for her… Well, it’s fiction, isn’t it? I can’t give my characters a completely easy ride.

Dare Club cover1
The Dare Club, available from Amazon